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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
jazeera that the taliban has to change if it wants to be part of the country 's leadership. >> if the taliban want to play in the future of afghanistan, they're going to have to account for this constitution. they're going to have to account for the rights of women, and they're going to have up -- have to give up violence. and the connections they have had with all kind of. -- all tied up. -- al qaeda. we leave that process to president karzai and his government, where it should properly reside. >> the government has agreed to hold talks with rebel forces. earlier this month, the roots are in opposition volunteered to negotiate with the government. seven new ministers have been appointed. no explanation was given for the changes. government jets on the outskirts of the capital sent in troops to try to capture sections of the key damascus ring road after rebels made gains there. they were tending to stop opposition fighters from moving into the city center -- are trying to stop opposition fighters from moving into the city center. the government is not backing down. >> this
the international symbol of opposition to the taliban has undergone another round of surgery. great britain's queen elizabeth's hospital says the pair of operations on malala were a success. she was shot in the head by a taliban gunman last october because she advocated education for girls. >>> a former navy s.e.a.l. who was known for his record-setting sniper skills has been shot to death. chris kyle was one of two men killed at a gun range in texas. he served four combat tours in iraq and wrote a best-selling book about his experiences as a sniper after he left the navy in 2009. police arrested a suspect in kyle's death and the second shooting victim, chad littlefield. those are your headlines. "reliable sources" at the top of the hour, but now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> only one person in the world who has won a nobel prize, an oscar, a grammy and an emmy. he's not an actor or a singer, he is an environmental activist, a writer, a very successful businessman and he happens to be the former vice president of the united states. i am, of course, speaking of al gore. he has a fascinating new
and the taliban are doing, because of their very extreme understanding of sunni islam, they're also targeting the shia. for example in pakistan, where i was commissioner, they killed 100 shia. that's appalling. a complete breakdown of law and order. no government can allow that and yet it happens. iran is a very strong, aggressive, shia power and it has interests in the region. so, again, it's on great game. balance has to be kept. so if you have an understanding in terms of the region, i think it can share. >> host: the country al -- of mali is entering. >> guest: you have being hearing about the tribes. they have been marginalized their lands robbed, million raleigh sources storm, really treated as third rate citizens on their own land by their central government. so their there comes a point when they say, enough is enough, we're going to react, and they react. unfortunately this is not a very civilized or very educated part of the world. these are tribesmen. most of them are illiterate. they only act according to their open tribal codes and the primary code is the law of revenge so they g
overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there. of course, afghanistan fell apart and we had go back. anorak it's falling apart very, very quickly. we are facing an insurgency, we don't know what to do. like nagl, all the officers who were there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. they do know what to do so they did what they usually do. which was to bang down doors and arrest and kill people, which is anybody who would read nagl what is known is counterproductive because you wind up killing the wrong people. you inflame, you this off their brother and their cousins and they become insurgents, too. so the insurgents is going. meanwhile, petraeus upend mosul besides to put into effect the ideas of these books he's been reading. so he and his guys, they start setting up elections for the new district council. they set up the elections. they bring in fuel trucks from turkey. they read open the university. they get to mutation systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria along northern iraq. it is all this on his own. he's
was shot in the head by taliban gunmen for speaking out for girl's education rights. in about 15 minutes we are investigating is north korea about to conduct another underground nuclear test? the whole world wants to know what's going on. we get answers. fareed zakaria's "gps" continues right now. >>> there's only one person in the world who has won a nobel prize, an oscar, a grammy and an emmy. he's not an actor or a singer, he is an environmental activist, a writer, a very successful businessman and he happens to be the former vice president of the united states. i am, of course, speaking of al gore. he has a fascinating new book out called "the future six drivers of global change." welcome back. >> thank you. good to be back. >> now, we could talk about everything and we will talk about the book, which is fascinating. but since i have you, so much we could cover. gun control. you and bill clinton passed the first big assault weapon ban. do you believe that that was responsible for your losses in the mid-term election, which has cast a shadow on the democratic party making even today cons
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)